Showing posts with label Textured Hair. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Textured Hair. Show all posts

Monday, 10 February 2014

Relaxing | Self Relaxer Preparation



This how I self-relax my hair with a no lye relaxer. Everything detailed here is a combination of my own personal experience with relaxers, what I've read online and from books. I am not a professional.

DO NOT relax on hair that is breaking or damaged.
If you are going to relax take the time to get your hair at it's best so you have the best results.
Do not try applying a relaxer yourself if you are not confident, please go to a professional instead.

Now let's begin, this is a pretty long post but I didn't want to miss anything...

The week before the day of your relaxer

3-7 days before relaxer day clarify to remove product build up and do the necessary conditioning treatments.
Relaxers break the hair's protein bonds, so it's good to do a protein treatment before relaxing.
Test porosity as low porosity hair might not relax and porous hair might be relaxed too easily. 
Hair needs to be fully dry and detangled 2 days before relaxer day as the scalp needs time to build up it's protective barrier (by producing sebum) to prevent scalp burns.
Do not comb or scratch the scalp as this causes damage leading to burns. 
Patch test. Section off about an inch of the hair, apply relaxer to the new growth and neutralise as normal. Take note of the results to guide how the relaxer will be applied on relaxer day.

Before the applying the relaxer

Read relaxer instructions!
Gather your tools before mixing the relaxer to make sure you have them all. You will need: plastic sectioning clips (not metal), an applicator brush/sprush, a plastic mixing bowl (optional), Vaseline or a protective base for the scalp, a thick conditioner or oil to protect previously relaxed ends, gloves and of course the relaxer kit. You will also need a timer and a old towel to put around your shoulders. 
Section the hair into 4 sections as shown in the relaxer instructions. You can make sections within the four sections to make the application process faster. 
Apply the protective base to your whole scalp but not on the hair as it will stop it from relaxing.
Apply oil/protective cream to previously relaxed hair.
Decide on your method of application i.e. self-relaxers might add oil to the relaxer in order to slow the process down and give themselves more time or have someone apply the relaxer to the back sections whilst they do the front. I use the half half method which involves relaxing half of your hair at a time. 

Applying the relaxer

If using no-lye, mix the relaxer until its a creamy, uniform consistency (usually for 1-2 minutes).
Start the timer!
Apply to the new growth only, one section at a time.
Start in areas that take longer to process. For me it's the middle so I start with one of the back sections and apply top to bottom. Try to rotate where you start relaxing i.e. if you last relaxed the left side first, start with the right side on your next relaxer.
Apply relaxer to the hairline/edges and nape last as these areas are the most delicate.
Most home relaxer instructions state to spend just 8 minutes in total applying the relaxer so you have to work quickly for an even result. 
SMOOTH SMOOTH SMOOTH. It's the smoothing process that makes the hair straight.
Aim for 80% straightness as 'bone straight' hair leaves the hair weaker.
Do not leave on until you feel burning! Your scalp should never burn.
Rinse with water and make sure ALL visible traces of the relaxer are gone before neutralising.
OPTIONAL: Before neutralising you can apply a protein treatment (leave 5 minutes extra to do this step).
Neutralise (with the shampoo that came in your relaxer kit). For the first use keep it on the hair for 5 minutes giving it time to neutralise. Rinse and apply again. Neutralising locks the hair in it's current state so keep smoothing the hair straight. Rinse and apply again. By this point you don't have to keep the hair straight.
Make sure all traces of the relaxer are gone before doing anything else. Some relaxer kits come with a colour indicator shampoo which I personally prefer as these let you know if the relaxer is still in your hair.
Protein step! As you've just broken your protein bonds by relaxing put it back to keep your hair strong.
MOISTURE MOISTURE MOISTURE. Use a moisturising deep conditioner after protein.
Test porosity. Relaxers dramatically lift the hair cuticle and porosity may have to be corrected.
Apply moisturiser/leave-in as normal and you're done!

Try to be gentle with your hair for the next week or so and monitor how well the relaxer process went. Another protein/moisturising treatment might be needed. Try to avoid heat as this could cause damage whilst your hair is in a weakened state.

By following these guidelines you should experience minimal breakage or damage.
Please don't use a relaxer before knowing how to apply it correctly and seek the advice of a professional. Relaxers are damaging, but it's the improper use of relaxers or not caring for your hair afterwards which can cause more problems.

Christine Stewart x
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Post updated & reposted 10/02/14

Tuesday, 28 January 2014

Hairstyle | Super textured braidout



In the midst of filming a totally unrelated video for YouTube I thought I'd share today's hairstyle - a super textured braidout.

I've got so much texlaxed hair and 16 weeks of natural new growth now it's just easier to do my hair in several small braids as opposed to the 2-4 I used to do for my whole head. Doing several braids has kept the tangles at bay as putting them in has made me actually detangle my hair fully for a change. I'm so lazy usually and just throw my hair up in a bun 24/7 when relaxer day is imminent.

I think I did about 4-5 braids on each side for this style before bed and slept on them overnight before gently unravelling the next morning. With this many braids I end up with big, textured and fluffy hair. When I only do 2-4 braids my hair seems to stay more compact and smooth usually. I've always loved big hair - though not normally on me - but I'm really starting to love how thick my hair can at least appear with super textured styles.

Do you like to do braidouts?

Christine Stewart x

Thursday, 2 January 2014

What is texlaxing?


Instead of processing my hair bone straight I purposely underprocess my hair to leave some texture which is called 'texlaxing'. Texlaxing is done with a relaxer, there isn't a product I'm aware of called a 'texlaxer'.



Why did I start texlaxing?
I first started texlaxing my hair by mistake in 2011. I wanted healthier hair and I was so scared of overprocessing I started leaving the relaxer on for less time. The result was slightly textured roots. At first I hated my texlaxed hair. To me it looked odd and, weirdly, damaged next to my bone straight hair. It was actually healthier than my straight hair, but I ended up trying to 'correct' it by reapplying a relaxer to the underprocessed parts. I did this several times but I never managed to successfully correct the texlaxed areas. The same areas even now are still texlaxed and this led to an impromptu transition to texlaxed hair. I love my texlaxed hair now and eventually want to cut off all the bone straight parts. 

What are the benefits of texlaxing?
Texlaxed hair is stronger than bone straight relaxed hair. When you relax your hair bone straight all of the protein bonds are cut and this leaves the hair significantly weaker than in it's natural state. This means when you reach for the heat, style roughly or neglect it, the hair can be damaged more easily. By leaving your hair with some strength it can resist damage better. Also, the point where your texlaxed and new growth meet (line of demarcation) isn't so pronounced so it's less likely to break.

What are the cons of texlaxing?
(These apply to those who choose to transition from relaxed to texlaxed hair)
- 3+ textures which can be difficult to blend
- Moisturising regularly is key or you might see breakage where the different textures meet
- Texlaxed hair is different to the bone straight ends so may require different treatment or products
- The texture (or lack of) of your ends might make them look thinner than the rest of your hair

How do you texlax?
- Use a mild relaxer rather than super or medium strength
- Put oil on your hair or in the relaxer itself to prevent it processing fully
- Leave the relaxer on your hair for less than the recommended time
- Skip the smoothing process which makes the hair straight
- Use only some of the activator liquid for no-lye kits

Have you heard of texlaxing?

Christine Stewart x

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Post updated & reposted 02/01/2014
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